ESBG calls for more feasible rules on the new corporate sustainability due diligence

In its response to the European Commission (EC)’s call for feedback on the proposal for a Directive on Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence, the ESBG suggests several changes to make the rules more feasible.

ESBG members support the goal to tackle environmental issues and human rights abuses as they commit to sustainable, responsible and future-oriented banking and support the creation of a coherent legal framework. Nevertheless, ESBG finds that the proposal foresees a role for financial entities that is too ambitious and could create legal uncertainty.

To avoid unfeasible implementation and monitoring costs, accompanied by uncertain legal consequences, we request further clarification on the role of financial entities in the context of the proposed Directive.Rules must be proportionate, feasible and should not restrict competition and innovation. The current environment might not be adequate for requirements that could hamper economic and financial recovery.

The ESBG feedback calls to limit the scope to companies with less than 1000 employees, and for a voluntary common due diligence framework of best practices for regulated financial undertakings that takes into account a specific connection to the provision of services by banks. It also calls for the introduction of a grandfathering provision for the identification of actual and potential adverse impacts and the creation of a uniform standard for the preparation of a Code of Conduct.

ESBG members underline that there is no need to establish new corporate directors’ duties and that existing liability regimes already provide appropriate rules. In consideration of the right to the presumption of innocence, businesses should not be held for damage in their supply chain if they did not directly cause it.

Additionally, several terms need to be further clarified and disproportionate provisions should be eliminated.

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